cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Chris Pruett - Director of Ecosystem

rosebud_the_sle
Level 5
Hi folks! My name is Chris Pruett, and I am the Director of Ecosystem for Content here at Oculus. I joined Oculus in 2014 and have spent the last four and a half years helping developers build better VR apps and games. Before that I ran a game studio, worked on Android at Google, and even further back, shipped a bunch of games for consoles. I'm a big fan of horror games.



I'm happy to answer your questions about VR engineering, game design, or market success. Please only post a question once, we'll see it!
59 REPLIES 59

illusivetoner
Level 2
When submitting a released Rift title for release on Quest, do you just want marketing materials or a full update on the released version?

warrenEBB
Level 3
is there any type of game/app on each platform that Oculus would like to see more of? (perhaps that you think the user base wants more of? or that will draw new user base to that platform?). 

Like, when i use the Go i think "this is the platform for 360 movies/narratives. For presence, not embodiment." Or when i use the Rift, i think "i'm so tired of short wave based shooters, but everyone seems to make them. this platform needs long form story games from AAA devs... but since I can't do that, I'll just ... go hard on weird experiments with embodiment". ... or maybe yall wish there were more cross platform titles? or more education? or something else. just curious.

DTDev
Level 2
Hey Chris,
I have a question on the Quest and the supporting ecosystem. I read on some online new sources today that Oculus will have a more strict policy about games that will be published on the Oculus Quest store. I also read that Oculus values testing with friends and the direct social circle of the developer (side loading). Will the "Approved for keys only" status be also kept intact for Oculus Quest apps? Are enterprise only apps still supported on the Quest?

Thank you for your answer

rosebud_the_sle
Level 5
I actually do not know the answer to this question, but I really appreciate the feedback. I'll make sure our product teams see it.

rosebud_the_sle
Level 5
Please give us any information that you can share on the success of your title on Rift (or even on other platforms)! We're looking for signal, and while marketing materials are also useful, having real-world success metrics is always good. We will supply some sample materials when we roll out the concept submission form that you can reference as well.

skyniteVRinside
Level 3
What support/guidance does Oculus have for Education apps on the Quest? The pricepoint and ease of use seem like a viable product for schools to order classroom sets. Is there any internal focus on the EDU market for Quest?

johnbart
Level 2
Long time listener, first time caller. A couple of quick questions:

1. Do you have any timeline on getting your cloud saves updated to something more developer friendly?
2. On a more abstract topic what do you think will finally get us past locomotion issues in VR:
a). Headset design
b). Experience design
c). Brain surgery
d). Other

pekayatt
Level 5
Hi Chris, first of all, YOU RULE!

Second is about Oculus Studios, it seems the strategy is to work with more well established game studios providing resources for the development of bigger/better VR Games. How do you guys select the studios to receive this funding?

It is possible or do make sense for Indie Studios to look for support from Oculus Studios?

Thanks!

rosebud_the_sle
Level 5
Good question! For Quest, we are primarily focused on video games. What we've seen on the PC side is that the simplest genres to execute (such as wave-based shooters) reach saturation quickly, with only a handful of stellar titles doing well. Titles that take on more challenging design problems (and execute them well) tend to have an easier time standing out. I think there is a huge design space to explore in VR, both for radically new concepts and for VR variants of traditional genres.

One thing we've found that works really well for a wide audience, nearly independent of genre, is good hand interactions. I used to think that the core magic of being in VR was visiting a virtual space, but now I've come to believe the magic is in the interaction with that space. Whatever you're working on, depth in near-field hand interactions seems to be a consistently successful approach.

rosebud_the_sle
Level 5
I touched on this earlier in the AMA. We will support keys-based distribution on a case-by-case basis.