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Grindeddown
Explorer
Status: New Idea

The Problem:

So I have been trying to use hand tracking more and more. While it is very accurate in Quest 3, perhaps almost too accurate. When attempting to selecting interface items at a distance using the reticle (cursor), when I pinch, the cursor moves and I often miss what I am targeting. I often have to try pinching several times and occasionally I click the wrong thing. incredibly frustrating. Ex: It’s incredibly difficult to press the ‘x’ to close a browser tab 

The Solution:

Create a magnetic snapping mechanism for the hand control cursor so when your hands’ cursor is near an interface item, it snaps to an item. When it “snaps” create a temporary small movement dead zone where the selection won’t move from that interface item until the hand has moved a sufficient distance and/or speed away from the item. This will help to increase interface selection accuracy when using hand tracking, reduce interface error rates, and make the whole experience more intentional. 

if you want a good example of this, break out an iPad Pro with a Magic Keyboard. On the Home Screen, when you navigate around with the cursor, the cursor will “snap” to specific interface items like an app icon, or an address bar in the browser, until there is sufficient movement and/or speed from the hand to warrant un-snapping. 

Not every interface item needs to be snap-able and the hands overlay itself should not stop moving just because the cursor is snapped to an interface item.  The biggest issues to be solved would be:

- Selecting text fields, search, address bars, etc…

- selecting hyperlinks on web pages and apps like instagram

- selecting apps and menu pages on the quest OS

- selecting the scroll bar on web pages and apps. 

Please implement this as I believe it would drastically improve the UX and would enable a good experience. Especially if future hardware were to be sold at lower cost without the need to bundle controllers with a device. 

All the best,

Brett Halladay